TERN REPORT - 2022 - Ted C. D'Eon
LOBSTER BAY - SOUTHWEST NOVA SCOTIA


Home
  • TERN REPORT 2021 |2020 |2019 |2018 |2017 |2016 |2015 |2014 |2013 |2012 |2011 |2010 |2009 |2008 |2007 |2006 |2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 | 2000 | 1999 | 1998 | 1997 | 1996 | 1995
  • The Brothers as seen from Lower West Pubnico. (2005 Ted D'Eon photo)
    The Brothers as seen from Lower West Pubnico. (2005 Ted D'Eon photo)

    The Brothers are two tiny islands about 1 km west of Lower West Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    They are owned by the province and were designated a wildlife management area in April 2007.
    Access to them during nesting season (April 1 to Aug. 31) is by permit only.


    This report will mostly cover work being done on North Brother, mostly from my perspective.

    Our work on these islands is done in cooperation with Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and the Nova Scotia Department of Lands and Forestry (NSDLF). - Ted D'Eon

    THE BROTHERS, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia
    THE BROTHERS, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia

    North BROTHERS and GULL ISLAND,<Br>Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia
    North BROTHERS and GULL ISLAND,
    Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia





    OBSERVATIONS:

    The following is a chronological listing of our 2022 work with terns of the Lobster Bay area in general, but in particular, with the Roseate Terns (ROST) of The Brothers. The report also includes tern observations from other professionals and university students working on these islands, as well as observations from local residents. - Ted D'Eon

    February 13, 2022 - The Brothers (North and South).

    I've recently purchased one of those 249 gram drones (DJI Mini 2) and flew to The Brothers from the end of Pond Road, Lower West Pubnico. All went well, and I got the photos and video I wanted. I was impressed!

    My primary goal was to verify the condition of the blind on N Brother as it looked fine and intact from the mainland.

    I also wanted overhead shots of the islands like I used to get with my paramotor (I haven't used it in a couple of years). I believe it's always useful to get reference photos of these islands to compare the changes over the years.

    The plywood blind looks the same as it did on the last day I was there (Sept 27, 2021), so I'm quite confident it will survive the remaining winter.

    See the photos below.

    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    North Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    South Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    South Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    South Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    South Brother - Feb. 13 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    April 8, 2022 - Middle West Pubnico.

    I have modified 10 old-style square ROST shelters to add to the 50 we already have on North Brother. I bekieve these should work fine.

    See photo below.

    Modified Roseate Tern shelters - April 8 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Modified Roseate Tern shelters - April 8 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    April 18, 2022 - North Brother

    What we (Gavin Maclean, Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau, and Shawn Craik) did today.

    Weather forecast was giving wind but calming down somewhat in the afternoon.

    Well, it was still blowing when we left Abbott's Harbour at 1pm.

    No problem getting to the island as it is not very far, but the landing was a different story

    Alexis and I made the first attempt with 6 ROST shelters and a few more items. We partially swamped the Zodiac upon making land and sort of lost control of it momentarily. We each got wet up to our thighs.

    I decided it was too dangerous to get everyone on the island, so we would get back to my boat after securing the ROST shelters we brought to the island into the plywood blind.

    We made it back to the boat and discussed the situation with the group.

    After some discussion, we decided to make another try and this time land at a part of the beach which didn't seem to be as wild as our first attempt.

    This time we got everyone safely on North Brother; all of us got wet to some extent.

    See the photos below of our work on the island. We managed to get done what we set out to do, and now, 60 ROST nesting shelters are properly placed on the island, ready for the terns' arrival in a week or 10 days.

    When it came time to leave the island, the weather had improved a lot, and now with very little swell so we had no problem getting back to Abbott's Harbour.

    Thank you so much to the wonderful crew: Gavin Maclean, Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau, and Shawn Craik.

    We had a very successful day!

    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Gathering fine gravel, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Gathering fine gravel, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Cleaning up dried up weeds, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Cleaning up dried up weeds, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Setting up Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Setting up Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Setting up Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Setting up Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Roseate Tern nesting shelters, North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    North Brother - April 18 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Me (Ted), Alexis, Luc, and Shawn - North Brother - April 18 2022 - Gavin Maclean photo
    Me (Ted), Alexis, Luc, and Shawn - North Brother - April 18 2022 - Gavin Maclean photo

    Me (Ted), Alexis, Luc, and Gavin - North Brother - April 18 2022 - Shawn Craik photo

    April 21, 2022 Drone photos of ROST nesting shelter layout.

    Roseate Tern shelter layout, North Brother - April 21 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Roseate Tern shelter layout, North Brother - April 21 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Click here to enlarge photo (you may have to click again on the photo).

    Roseate Tern shelter layout, North Brother - April 21 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Roseate Tern shelter layout, North Brother - April 21 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Click here to enlarge photo (you may have to click again on the photo).

    April 26, 2022 - Lobster fisherman, Lorne Spinney photographed a tern on a buoy somewhere in Lobster Bay.

    May 2, 2022 - "About 50 terns about 1.75 mile west of John's Island", reported by lobster Fisherman, Edouard D'Eon. That's about 10 kilometres south of The Brothers.

    May 3, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont writes:

    Jerome d'Eon and I swung by North Brother this morning before surveying for Brant on 26 Lobster Bay Islands (91 km round trip). At least 160 terns were present on North Brother, including about 10 Arctics. See the checklist:

    I've uploaded photos of the colonies on eBird: (see https://ebird.org/checklist/S108828493)

    Thank you, Alix.

    May 12, 2022 - North Brother visit by Shawn Craik, Sophie Landry, Luc Bilodeau & Alexis Saulnier - Sophie Landry writes:

    ... Upon our arrival, we saw but four terns circling North Brother. Throughout our visit, we observed a few small flocks of terns, including one Roseate, and the largest flock counting a total of 20 terns. We also noticed one Common Eider nest with 4 eggs on the island.

    We accomplished what we had set out to do for this trip, which was to check the Roseate nesting boxes for the beginning of nest scrapes, as well as clear any encroaching vegetation in or around the boxes.

    Common Eider nest - North Brother - May 12, 2022 - Sophie Landry photo
    Common Eider nest - North Brother - May 12, 2022 - Shawn Craik photo

    Thank you, Sophie, for the report.

    May 15, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont writes:

    "Kathleen MacAulay and I viewed North Brother briefly from the boat yesterday (May 14) in the fog. We estimated about 35 Common Terns and 3 Arctics."

    Thanks, Alix and Kathleen.

    May 19, 2022 - Lobster fisherman. Ben Morton, asked other fishers in Lobster Bay to report to him observations of terns around Lobster Bay Islands:

    Text sent from him to Shawn Craik

    "...guys fishing around (Gull Island) are seeing them."

    May 20, 2022 - North Brother visit - Sophie Landry writes:

    "As we approached the island this morning, we estimated between 150-200 terns.

    Our goal today was to identify some COTE and ARTE nests and check ROST nest boxes. We counted 7 ROST boxes with nest scrapes (no eggs yet) and about 30 COTE nests (to be confirmed from the blind).

    We also counted 7 eider nests (one of which remained occupied by the female during the entirety of our visit!).

    We did not identify any ARTE nests, but we didn’t walk along the eastern ridge as to not disturb the eider on her nest.

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry."

    Thank you, team Université Sainte Anne, and to Sophie for the report. Nice to see the 150 to 200 terns at North Brother; this is very encouraging for another successful season for 2022!

    May 23, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont texted me, "About 25 terns on Île Ferrée (Pubnico Harbour). 40 feeding between Île Ferrée and the Pont du Marais." Good news!

    May 24, 2022 - Dennis Point and North Brother - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier.

    Sophie and I started out our day by visiting Dennis Point Wharf to conduct observations of fish (i.e., herring) and terns in the area, where we established that neither were present at the time we were there.

    Around noon, Luc joined us for a visit to North Brother Island, where we estimated about 350 terns upon our arrival. We walked through the colony to check the ROST shelters, as well as mark Common (22) and Arctic (10) tern nests for monitoring.

    Seven shelters contained single Roseate tern eggs. Only six Roseate terns were seen at a time during the observations from the blind, however the state of the ROST shelters indicate that at least 14 Roseate terns have been frequenting the island.

    Two banded Roseate terns were identified: L12 (red band on the right leg – nest R41) and L93 (red band on the right leg – nest R43). Team: Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry

    May 25, 2022 - Trip report to Wood's Harbour islands by Sophie Landry.

    Shawn, Alix and I made a trip from Woods Harbour to survey foraging terns in the area.

    John's Island and
    John's Island and "The Ball" island area (Navionics chart)

    "The Ball" island, bar and ledge - near Wood's Harbour (Navionics chart)

    At The Ball bar, the tide was

    high, but we saw up to 10 COTE and 2 ROST foraging over the rip as near as 50m from the boat. Prey seemed to be mostly sandlance (see below, photos by Alix). We also saw a few COTE foraging at the bar near John’s Island and 2 ROST fly over the bar at John’s Island going South.

    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Common Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern carrying sandlance - May 25, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alix d’Entremont & Sophie Landry.

    May 26, 2022 - North Brother - Trip report by Sophie Landry.

    On Thursday, (May 26) we installed the weather station on the island and checked the status of nests of all species. About 450 terns were circling the island as we arrived. There were 17 ROST nest boxes with eggs (two of which had 2 eggs)! We identified more ARTE (24 total) and COTE (25 total) nests and 2 new COEI nests (9 total). Two more banded ROST were identified at nest box 2: L03 and L05.

    We also started our directional prey scans, during which we saw most prey coming from the South.

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry.

    See below, some photos (taken by Luc Bilodeau) of prey seen on the island on May 26.

    Common Tern carrying squid - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern carrying squid - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern carrying herring - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern carrying herring - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern carrying probable hake - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern carrying probable hake - North Brother, May 26, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    The wharves at Dennis Point - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    The wharves at Dennis Point - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    Dennis Point construction at wharf #4 - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Dennis Point construction at wharf #4 - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    Dennis Point (from the south looking northeast) - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Dennis Point (from the south looking northeast) - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon

    Dennis Point (wharves #1 and #2) - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    Dennis Point (wharves #1 and #2) - May 29 2022 - Drone photo by Ted D'Eon
    From mid-June to first week in August, lots of terns (including Roseates)
    forage in this area, but especially to the north of wharf #1

    May 30, 2022 - North Brother report by Soplie Landry.

    We headed out to the island in the afternoon to check the status of nests of all species and collect directional prey data.

    Our estimate tern count is about 500 terns. We counted 35 ROST nests (2 outside nest boxes)!

    In terms of prey species, we saw sandlance, lumpfish, hake, and herring.

    Five banded Roseate terns were identified:

    - L76 (red band on the right leg – nest R39),
    - L35 (red band on the left leg – nest R42),
    - L96 (red band on the left leg – nest R57),
    - L47 (red band on the right leg – nest R29), and
    - L00 (red band on the left leg – nest R29).
    

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry

    Some photos by Luc Bilodeau:

    Roseate Tern with sandlance - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern with sandlance - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with Atlantic Saury - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with Atlantic Saury - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Note: This is a very rare prey species for The Brothers
    but I have seen them before (Ted).

    Common Tern with stickleback - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with stickleback - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, May 30, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    June 1, 2022 - Dennis Point Wharf - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier.

    Wednesday morning, Sophie and I went to Dennis Point Wharf to check for the presence of fish and terns.

    During our observations to the North of the wharf, we noted the presence of a large school of fish – easily a few hundred – which we identified as possible herring. This marks our first observations of probable prey for the terns at Dennis Point this year!

    We also noticed a dozen larger orange coloured fish measuring about a foot in length, but the visibility was too poor to identify them.

    Three Common terns were seen diving about 50 m off the new extension to the wharf, one of which even circled a nearby effluent pipe surrounded by gulls.

    (Later in the day) We were unable to make our way to North Brother safely due to large swells, so we returned to Dennis Point for more observations with Shawn.

    Team: Shawn Craik, Sophie Landry & Alexis Saulnier

    June 3, 2022 - At sea, south of The Brothers, towards Wood's Harbour - report by Sophie Landry.

    During our at-sea foraging survey, we didn’t see any terns at The Ball bar. However, we saw a total of 18 terns, including a total of 5 ROST, flying over John’s Island toward the south. A group of 4 COTE were diving around the bar at John’s Island before continuing south.

    Later, on North Brother Island, we didn’t see many terns returning with prey, but we did see 1 ROST returning with sandlance from the South.

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alix d’Entremont & Sophie Landry.

    June 3, 2022 - North Brother - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier.

    Luc and I visited Dennis Point to conduct observations, however no fish nor terns were present while we were there.

    We then joined Shawn and Sophie for an outing to North Brother Island where we visited the nests and observed terns arriving to the island with prey. About 500 terns flushed the island upon our arrival.

    We found 41 active nests of Roseate terns, 28 of which had two eggs. One nest had but a single unfertilized egg (see photo).

    Roseate Tern nest - North Brother, Junw 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern nest - North Brother, Junw 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    No evidence of predation or carcasses was found, indicating a healthy colony. All nine Common Eider nests were active and warm.

    We also observed a tern with a yellow band but were unable to clearly see the ID number.

    Thanks to Luc’s photos, we were able to identify more banded Roseate terns:

    - LJ0 (red band on the right leg)
    - B65 (red band on the left leg)
    - LD0 (red band on the right leg)
    - B75 (red band on the left leg)
    - L32 (red band on the right leg)
    - L33 (red band on the left leg)
    - L40 (red band on the left leg)
    - B95 (red band on the right leg)
    - B25 (red band on the right leg)
    - L94 (red band on the left leg)
    

    Team: Shawn Craik, Sophie Landry, Luc Bilodeau & Alexis Saulnier

    Some photos by Luc Bilodeau:

    Arctic Tern with sandlance - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Arctic Tern with sandlance - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with hake - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with hake - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with pollock - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with pollock - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with isopod - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with isopod - North Brother, June 3, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    June 6, 2022 - North Brother - Trip report by Sophie Landry.

    We made our way to North Brother Island in the morning to collect some directional prey data. Upon arrival we estimated upwards of 500 terns. During our observations, most terns with prey were seen returning from the South.

    The most common prey species brought back to the colony was first and foremost herring, then some sandlance, butterfish, hake, and lumpfish.

    We were not able to return in the afternoon due to the wind.

    Note: We also saw a COTE with an interesting tag (see photo).

    Common Tern with coloured flag leg band - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with coloured flag leg band - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    This must be the same bird we saw on North Brother on May 31, 2020. Or, is it? In 2020, it seemed to be missing the claws and possibly a toe from its left foot!?

    This is what I wrote at that time (2020).

    "There was also a banded COTE with an orange flag on one leg and a metal band on the other. The grey metal band looks Argentinian. We've seen Argentinian bands on North Brother before. See below."

    The banded Common Tern - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The banded Common Tern - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The bands, a little closer - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The bands, a little closer - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The metal band - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The metal band - North Brother, NS, May 31, 2020 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Now, back to June 6, 2022.

    Two new banded Roseate terns were identified by photograph: B33 (red band on the right leg) & B76 (red band on the left leg).

    Team: Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry

    Well done, Alexis, Luc, and Sophie.

    Some photos by Luc Bilodeau.

    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Arctic Tern with hake - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Arctic Tern with hake - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Arctic Tern with sandlance - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Arctic Tern with sandlance - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with mummichog - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with mummichog - North Brother, June 6, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    June 7, 2022 - Trip to Ball Bar with Alix d'Entremont - report by Sophie Landry.

    On Thursday morning (June 7) , Alix and I made another trip out to The Ball bar and surrounding islands to monitor tern feeding behaviour in the area. There were no terns feeding at the Ball, but we saw a total of 9 COTE fly over the bar to and from the South, including one individual carrying a fish. The occasional tern would bank over the bar or attempt a dive, but no groups were seen foraging consistently.

    At John’s Island, we saw similar behaviour, terns were flying over the bar to and from the South. One tern dove once before moving on. We didn’t see any ROST on our trip.

    Team: Alix d’Entremont & Sophie Landry

    June 7, 2022 - Dennis Point and North Brother - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier.

    Luc and I started by visiting Dennis Point Wharf in the morning. Although we saw no fish near the wharves, we did see three Common terns dipping over the water to the South of the new wharf extension (roughly the same location as was last recorded on June 1st).

    With great weather, we sailed to North Brother mid-morning. As we arrived, we estimated that no less than 550 terns were circling the island.

    We walked through the colony to check the status of the nests and found 43 Roseate tern nests. The colony was more aggressive than usual and, though we observed some terns arriving with fish, there was a relatively low volume of prey brought back to the island. We believe this may be due to their anticipation of the hatching of chicks in the coming days.

    Luc’s photos revealed that hake and herring were the prey of choice for the day. We were also able to identify a new banded Roseate tern: L53 (red band on the right leg).

    All nine Common Eider nests were still warm and active – one even had a two newly hatched ducklings! There was no evidence to suggest that predators nor the Avian Influenza have reached the colony.

    Team: Luc Bilodeau, Sophie Landry & Alexis Saulnier

    Some photos by Luc Bilodeau.

    Spotted Sandpiper - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Spotted Sandpiper - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern carrying two hake - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern carrying two hake - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with herring - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    One juvenile and one adult?

    Common Terns sharing their catch of herring - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Terns sharing their catch of herring - North Brother, June 7, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    June 11, 2022 David Surette, a retired lobster fisherman and seaweed harvester living in Middle West Pubnico, very close to the shore of Pubnico Harbour, reports no terns foraging this year below his house. I checked the situation out also, and also couldn't scope out a single tern along that shore and as far as I could see.

    I scoped out Île Ferrée and couldn't see any terns there either!

    Île Ferrée, Pubnico Harbour - Ted D'Eon photo
    Île Ferrée, Pubnico Harbour - Ted D'Eon photo

    The island is about 30 metres in diameter at its widest and in 2020 hosted an incredible 277 Common Tern nests in 2020, 176 nests in 2019, and 41 in 2018.

    However, 2021 was not a good year for Île Ferrée: 24 tern nests there on May 26, down to 3 on June 2, and then up again to 25 on June 6. 2021. Definitely a predator problem there! (Great Horned Owl, gull, mink, fox?)

    June 11, 2022 - (evening) My daughter, Ingrid D'Eon, reported about 4 terns foraging at Abbott's Harbour.

    June 11, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont reports "At least 2 Roseates on nests at Cape Sable!". Wow, exciting news! Thanks Alix!

    Alix writes:

    Kathleen MacAulay and I spent about 1.75 hrs anchored off the large tern colony on Cape Sable this morning (red star in map below).

    We were able to confirm at least five Roseates sitting on nests. We did not land so only observed from the boat. I was able to take images of the fish being carried by the ROST. We were not able to determine which direction the ROST were returning from with fish as we focused on confirming breeding.

    We did, however, see a ROST foraging at Hawk Inlet (here 43.404024, -65.614290) with a loose group of COTE/ARTE and then another ROST foraging with a group of about 30 COTE and 20 ARTE (here 43.405252, -65.627648). See the orange stars in the map below for these two Roseate foraging locations.

    There were COTE and ARTE foraging between the two green stars on the map below. Roughly 20-50 COTE/ARTE were seen headed west from the direction of Barrington Bay (see green arrow in map below). There were terns seen foraging sparsely farther out in the bay, but I believe most terns headed west were from an area farther east than we could see (towards Baccaro?).

    Cape Sable area, Shelburne county - Navionics chart/Alix d'Entremont
    Cape Sable area, Shelburne county - Navionics chart/Alix d'Entremont

    I've added a bunch of images as attachments to this email. DSC_9586.jpg is a photo of two ROST on nests and the rest are images of ROST carrying fish (with some courtship feeding).

    DSC_9586.jpg - Roseate Tern on nest, Cape Sable, Shelburne county - Alix d'Entremont photo
    DSC_9586.jpg - Roseate Tern on nest, Cape Sable, Shelburne county - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern with Sandlance, Cape Sable, Shelburne county - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern with Sandlance, Cape Sable, Shelburne county - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Here are all of the eBird checklists with more images: see

    https://ebird.org/checklist/S112691670
    https://ebird.org/checklist/S112691766
    https://ebird.org/checklist/S112691851
    
    Thank you Alix and Kathleen!

    June 12, 2022 - North Brother and Dennis Point - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier.

    After many days of large swells, high winds, and rain, we were finally able to make our way to check on the colony on North Brother.

    Upon our arrival, we noted the very first Common tern chicks. We then decided we should return to shore and prepare for the nest count.

    Luc and I walked through the colony marking and calling out nest species and egg counts as Sophie took note of our findings.

    Our final tally of the nests on North Brother Island for 2022 is a remarkable 1032 nests – the NBI nest count for 2021 was 893.

    To date, we have identified 43 Roseate tern nests. We noticed about a half dozen broken tern eggs, however it was difficult to tell whether they had been depredated or sent rolling down the rocky shore by waves and/or wind following an attempt at predation.

    We were unable to check the status of all the Eider nests, but seven were still active and warm, some with eggshells and egg membranes nearby indicating a hatched duckling. One additional Eider nest was found with two eggs. One Common Eider egg was found that had clearly been depredated.

    We finished off the day by visiting Dennis Point, but no fish were seen surrounding the wharf.

    12 Common terns were seen flying over the water to the East of wharves 1 & 2 (a few aborted dives, but no evidence of foraging was observed).

    14 Common terns were seen to the South, but it is possible that some of these had been previously counted to the East of the wharves, as they had been last seen heading to the South.

    Team: Luc Bilodeau, Sophie Landry & Alexis Saulnier

    Well done Luc, Sophie, and Alexis.

    1032 is a huge number of tern nests for this tiny island!
    It is the highest number of tern nests that I know of or ever heard of being recorded there! Amazing!

    Tern Nests Numbers on The Brothers - 1990 to 2022
      N. Brother S. Brother totals
    June 7, 1990 302 28 330
    June 11, 1991 441 13 454
    June 11, 1992 413 0 413
    June 9, 1993 367 0 367
    June 8, 1994 380 0 380
    June 14, 1995 457 0 457
    June 16, 1996 554 12 566
    June 12, 1997 630 120 750
    June 11, 1998 452 151 603
    June 7, 1999 399 0 399
    June 10, 2000 491 0 491
    June 9, 2001 817 63 880
    June 13, 2002 655 178 833
    June 13, 2003 648 102 750
    June 12, 2004 526 0 526
    June 13, 2005 445 0 445
    June 13, 2006 616 0 616
      N. Brother S. Brother totals
    June 10, 2007 365 0 365
    June 8, 2008 590 0 590
    June 13, 2009 546 0 546
    June 12, 2010 714 0 714
    June 11, 2011 725 0 725
    June 8, 2012 658 0 658
    June 10, 2013 680 0 680
    June 9, 2014 731 0 731
    June 12, 2015 722 0 722
    June 11, 2016 661 0 661
    June 12, 2017 165 0 165
    June 16, 2018 074 0 074
    June 7, 2019 200 0 200
    June 14, 2020 713 0 713
    June 11, 2021 893 0 893
    June 12, 2022 1032 0 1032
           

    The number of tern nests on The Brothers - A yearly comparison
    Please note: The Roseate Terns had not finished nesting at the time of these nest counts.

    June 15, 2022 - Dennis Point and North Brother - Trip report by Sophie Landry.

    In the morning we headed to Dennis Point, where we saw a few terns fly overhead. The only foraging tern we saw was picking at the scraps left behind by the gulls at the effluent pipe South of wharf 4.

    Common Tern with fish bits from effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with fish bits from effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Herring Gull picking scraps from effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Herring Gull picking scraps from effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    The construction supervisor at the wharf, Bob Morton, informed us that on Tuesday (June 14) he saw quite a few terns diving about 10 feet from the new wharf extension and he saw schools of fish near the edge of the wharf. We also saw some prey fish, possibly juvenile herring, in between wharves 2 and 3.

    In the afternoon, we were able to get out to the island (North Brother) to check the nests and collect directional data. Most terns returning with prey were seen from the East and the North.

    We also saw our first ROST chick, so we will be banding soon!

    Team: Alexis Saulnier, Luc Bilodeau & Sophie Landry

    Arctic Tern with chick at monitored nest A01 - North Brother, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Arctic Tern with chick at monitored nest A01 - North Brother, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Arctic Tern with hake - North Brother, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Arctic Tern with hake - North Brother, June 15, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    June 16, 2022 - At-sea survey - Trip report by Sophie Landry.

    Shawn, Alix and I completed another at-sea survey on Thursday morning. We saw 3 ROST and up to 3 COTE foraging East of The Ball bar.

    Near the bar at John’s Island, we saw 1 ROST dive once South of the bar, but no other foraging activity. However, we were able to see small fish from the side of the boat (about 0.75 culmen in length).

    A total of 10 COTE were seen flying over the surveyed area toward the South.

    Team: Shawn Craik, Alix d’Entremont & Sophie Landry

    June 16, 2022 - At-sea survey - Trip report by Alexis Saulnier. While Sophie and Shawn were doing an at-sea survey with Alix, Luc and I began the day by visiting Dennis Point Wharf to observe the presence of fish and terns. What we suspect to be juvenile herring was spotted at two of the observation sites next to wharves 1 and 2. We also observed six Common terns dipping for bits of fish left behind by the gulls feeding at the effluent pipe, as well as up to eight Common terns foraging and dipping on the northern side of wharf 1.

    Common Tern dipping for fish bits at the effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern dipping for fish bits at the effluent pipe - Dennis Point, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Four Common terns were foraging between the boats stationed at wharves 1 and 2. To the south of wharf 4, we counted 17 Common terns where the majority of which (9) were diving adjacent to the new extension to the wharf. Up to eight Common terns were looking for leftover pieces of fish near the effluent pipe with a few gulls.

    On the island, Shawn, Sophie, Luc, and I thinned the vegetation around the Roseate nesting boxes to limit growth and facilitate observations from the blind.

    We then conducted observations looking for terns arriving to North Brother with prey as well as a feeding watch on the nest (R44) with the only hatched Roseate tern chick. Most prey was seen arriving from the East and South, comprised of herring and mummichog. Our observations in the afternoon revealed that most terns with prey were arriving from the South carrying herring.

    Common Tern feeding sandlance to chick - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern feeding sandlance to chick - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with possible cunner - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with possible cunner - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern with hake - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common Tern with pollock - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common Tern with pollock - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Roseate Tern with herring - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Roseate Tern with herring - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    We were finally able to identify the yellow banded Roseate tern in nest R57 as T42 (yellow band on the left leg). Luc also photographed a Common tern with a black band reading R76 on the right leg (see photo).

    Common tern with black band R76 - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common tern with black band R76 - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo

    Common tern with black band R76 - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    Common tern with black band R76 - North Brother, June 16, 2022 - Luc Bilodeau photo
    New bands identified by Luc’s photos:
    
    L13 (red band on right leg – nest R4)
    L87 (red band on the right leg)
    B39 (red band on right leg)
    R76 (black band on right leg – Common tern)
    Team: Shawn Craik, Luc Bilodeau, Sophie Landry & Alexis Saulnier
    

    June 18, 2022 - Cape Sable - Report by Alix d'Entremont.

    Kathleen MacAulay, Bertin d'Eon, Logan Moore and I carried out the tern colony census at Cape Sable. Many details can be found at this eBird checklist https://ebird.org/checklist/S113218558, but the brief update is that we now have 6 Roseate nests, 5 of which are marked. Some of the non-viable eggs and perhaps chicks were likely attributable to a washout.

    Thankfully, the Roseate nests appear to be in areas with slightly higher elevation.

    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern nest, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    I wasn't able to read any PFRs. I know at least one Roseate did have one of our plastic bands.

    I could return in a week or two to check on the Roseate nests and attempt to photograph PFRs.

    The aerial image below shows my track during the surveys. You'll see there are two areas of back and forth on land representing the two nearby colonies.

    Tern colony, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo/Google Maps
    Tern colony, Cape Sable - June 18, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo/Google Maps

    Thank you, Alix, Kathleen, Bertin, and Logan! Great work!

    June 19, 2022 - Île Chespêque, Pubnico Harbour - from eBird Checklist by Alix d'Entremont (see https://ebird.org/checklist/S113272845).

    Tern colony survey for Université Sainte-Anne and the Canadian Wildlife Service.

    A total of 26 Common Tern nests were found on the southern end of the island. The island is covered in poison ivy and most nests were surrounded by the plant.

    Nests:
    1 egg          (2)
    2 eggs         (8)
    3 eggs        (14)
    1 chick        (1)
    1 egg, 1 chick (1)
    Total = 26
    

    The terns lifted upon our arrival and called for a few minutes, but after stayed in the air mostly not directly above the colony. This may be due to the small size of the colony. In larger colonies, the birds are much more aggressive towards unwanted visitors.

    Thank you Alix and Kathleen.

    Common Tern nest in Poison Ivy, Île Chespêque - June 19, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Common Tern nest in Poison Ivy, Île Chespêque - June 19, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    June 19, 2022 - Round and Flat Islands ("Mud Island" group of islands in Lobster Bay).

    It was a family outing. Our primary aim was to do a tern nest count on Flat Island.

    Our first stop was to the east side of Round Island to get an estimate of the Atlantic Puffins and Black Guillemots there. We were not disappointed as there were about 40 to 50 of each.

    Some of the Puffins at Round Island - June 19 2022 - Missie D'Eon photo
    Some of the Puffins at Round Island - June 19 2022 - Missie D'Eon photo

    We then headed west for a few kilometres and landed on Flat Island to conduct the nest count. The total count was 23 with the nests being about half Common Tern and half Arctic Tern. Most of the ARTE nests were in the rocks and gravels on the south side of the pond, while most of the COTE nests were at the far western end of the island.

    Nests:
    1 egg          (4)
    2 eggs        (15)
    3 eggs         (3)
    1 egg, 1 chick (1)
    Total = 23
    

    Flat Island looking to the west - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Flat Island looking to the west - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    More photos of our trip.

    At the house on Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    At the house on Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Searching out tern nests, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Searching out tern nests, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Zelda marking an Arctic Tern nest with a popsicle stick, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Zelda marking an Arctic Tern nest with a popsicle stick, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Arctic Tern nest, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic Tern nest, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Zelda, Andrea, Ingrid, Emmett, Nigel and Missie, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Zelda, Andrea, Ingrid, Emmett, Nigel and Missie, Flat Island - June 19 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Crew: Andrea Atkinson (my niece), Ingrid D'Eon (my daughter), with Nigel (my son) and his wife Missie D'Eon and their children, Zelda and Emmett. We had a great family day!

    June 21 and 22, 2022 - Banding ROST chicks (June 22) as Eastlink TV making an episode of "Wild Nova Scotia" about the tern colony of North Brother and what we've been doing for it over the years. The documentary will be aired on Eastlink TV sometime next summer.

    Any publicity we can give to the Roseate Terns and the other terns in general, I feel, is good publicity.

    Shawn Craik giving an interview to Tracy Bennett of Eastlink - June 21 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Shawn Craik giving an interview to Tracy Bennett of Eastlink - June 21 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Eastlink at Abbott's Harbour recording the introduction for the show - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Eastlink at Abbott's Harbour recording the introduction for the show - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Me with the host of the show - Zoe D'Amato, North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Me with the host of the show, Zoe D'Amato - North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Roseate Tern nesting area on North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Roseate Tern nesting area on North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Luc and Alexis searching out ROST chicks for banding, North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Luc and Alexis searching out ROST chicks for banding, North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Eastlink TV crew recording the ROST chick banding process, North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Eastlink TV crew recording the ROST chick banding process, North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST chick banding - North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST chick banding - North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Luc and Alexis collecting ROST chick feces for later DNA analysis - North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Luc and Alexis collecting ROST chick feces for later DNA analysis.
    This will help confirm the identity of the food being brought to the colony.
    North Brother - June 22 2022 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Université Sainte Anne team arriving to mainland from North Brother - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Université Sainte Anne team arriving to mainland from North Brother - Ted D'Eon photo

    Thank you, Sophie, Shawn, Alexis and Luc - Ted D'Eon photo
    Thank you, Sophie, Shawn, Alexis and Luc - Ted D'Eon photo

    A big THANK YOU also to the Eastlink crew for making us feel (relatively) comfortable in front of the camera and for being ever so cautious in and around the tern colony.

    June 26 2022 - Dennis Point, Lower West Pubnico. Alix d'Entremont reports that in the evening there were at least 8 ROST foraging from 10m to 300m south of wharf #4. He photographed a Roseate Tern successfully catching prey near the construction site for the extension to wharf # 4.

    See below.

    Roseate Tern with fish in bill - Dennis Point, June 26, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Roseate Tern with fish in bill - Dennis Point, June 26, 2022 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    ROST nest numbers on The Brothers - 1991 to 2021

    Field-readable Roseate Tern leg bands - North Brother (unless listed otherwise) - 2022. (See below)

    Resighted and new leg bands on Roseate Terns from North Brother in 2022
    June 3, 2022
    Red B25 right leg -
    1172-79329, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother as a chick July 3, 2012.
    Previously seen on Gull Island in 2018, and on North Brother in 2019 and 2020.
    June 6, 2022
    Red B33 right leg -
    1172-79337, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother.
    Also seen on North Brother in 2017 and 2019
    and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    June 16, 2022
    Red B39 right leg -
    1172-79344, Sex unknown
    Banded as an adult on North Brother on June 20, 2013.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2014, 2015, 2019 and 2020,
    on North Brother and on Gull Island in 2017,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 3, 2022
    Red B65 left leg -
    0802-04928, Male (from head-bill length)
    Banded as a chick on North Brother on July 16, 2007
    Previously seen on North Brother in 2014, 2015, 2016, 2019 and 2020,
    and on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    June 3, 2022
    Red B75 left leg -
    9822-51511, Sex unknown
    Banded as an adult in 2014 on North Brother.
    Encountered on North Brother in 2015, 2016 and 2019,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    Nested with B90 on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 6, 2022
    Red B76 left leg -
    9822-51512, Sex unknown
    Banded as an adult in 2014 on North Brother.
    Encountered on North Brother in 2016, 2019 and 2020.
    Encountered in 2017 and 2018 on Gull Island.
    Nested with an unbanded bird in 2018.
    June 3, 2022
    Red B95 right leg -
    9822-51530, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother as a chick July 11, 2014.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018,
    and on North Brother in 2019 and 2020, and on Cape Sable in 2021.
    May 30, 2022
    Red L00 left leg -
    9822-51537, Sex unknown
    Banded as an adult on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, June 25, 2015.
    Also seen on North Brother in 2016, 2019, and 2020, and on Gull Island in 2018.
    Paired with L99 on North Brother in 2019.
    Paired with L47 in 2022. (Nest R29).
    May 26, 2022
    Red L03 left leg -
    9822-51537, Female (from head-bill length)
    Banded as an adult on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, June 25, 2015.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2016, 2017, 2019 and 2020,
    on Gull Island in 2017, and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    Paired with L05 in 2022 (Nest R02).
    May 26, 2022
    Red L05 left leg -
    0802-04917, Sex unknown (probable male as paired with female L03)
    Banded as a chick on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, on July 16, 2007.
    L05 band placed on it on June 25, 2015, at North Brother.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2016, 2017, 2019 and 2021,
    on Gull Island in 2017, and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    Paired with L02 in 2015.
    Paired with L03 in 2022 (Nest R02).
    May 24, 2022
    Red L12 right leg -
    9822-51546, Sex unknown
    Banded as a chick on North Brother, Nova Scotia on July 10, 2015.
    Nested on Gull Island in 2018.
    Seen on North Brother in 2019 and 2020.
    Nest R41 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 16, 2022
    Red L13 right leg -
    9822-51547, Sex unknown
    Banded as a chick on North Brother, Nova Scotia on July 10, 2015.
    Seen on Peases Island in 2018, and on North Brother in 2019, 2020, and 2021.
    Paired with L87 on North Brother in 2020.
    Nest R4 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 3, 2022
    Red L32 right leg - (reported as "left leg" in 2022) -
    9822-51561, Male (courtship feeding of female)
    Banded as a chick on North Brother, Nova Scotia on July 10, 2015.
    Seen on North Brother in 2019 and 2020.
    June 3, 2022
    Red L33 left leg -
    9822-51562, Female
    trapped and banded as adult on North Brother in 2015.
    2015 mated to 765N.
    In 2015 with band injury (USGS) 802-04956 removed
    Seen on Gull Island in 2017. No mention of a missing foot in 2017.
    May 2019 – seen at Race Point, Barnstable, MA (ebird) with right foot USGS
    band down and constricting foot.
    This bird is missing a foot (2021)
    Mated with male B71 (9022-51506) on North Brother in 2021 (copulation observed).
    May 30, 2022
    Red L35 left leg -
    1172-79448, Sex unknown
    Originally banded C53 as a chick on Country Island in 2012.
    Must have lost its C53 band.
    Rebanded on North Brother with PFR L35 in 2017.
    Observed on the Bear Point Thrums in 1018
    and on North Brother in 2019.
    Nest R42 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 3, 2022
    Red L40 left leg -
    9822-51569, Female (from head-bill length)
    Banded as an adult on North Brother on June 22, 2015.
    Seen on Gull Island in 2017, and on North Brother in 2019, 2020 and 2021.
    May 30, 2022
    Red L47 right leg -
    9822-51573, Sex unknown
    Banded as a chick on North Brother, Nova Scotia. on July 5, 2016
    Seen on North Brother in 2019, 2020 and 2021.
    Paired with L00 in 2022. (Nest R29).
    June 7, 2022
    Red L53 left leg - (reported as "right leg" in 2022)
    9822-51577, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother as a chick on July 5, 2016.
    Seen on North Brother in 2019 and 2020.
    May 30, 2022
    Red L76 right leg -
    9822-51600, Sex unknown
    Banded as a chick in 2016, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018, and on N Brother in 2019, 2020 and 2021.
    Paired with T83 on North Brother in 2021.
    Nest R39 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 16, 2022
    Red L87 right leg -
    9822-52910, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother, Nova Scotia, as a chick on July 11, 2016.
    Seen on North Brother in 2019 and 2020.
    Paired with L13 on North Brother in 2020.
    May 24, 2022
    Red L93 left leg - (reported as "right leg" in 2022)
    9822-52914, Sex unknown
    Banded as an adult on North Brother on June 15, 2017
    and received a PathTrack GPS tag.
    Encountered on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    Nesting on Gull Island in 2018 with an unbanded bird.
    Seen on North Brother in 2019, 2020 and 2021.
    Seen at The Ball tidal rip in May 15, 2021.
    Nest R43 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 3, 2022
    Red L94 left leg -
    9822-52915, Sex unknown
    Originally banded in 2005 in Mangue Seco, Brazil, with band H70051
    Rebanded on North Brother as an adult in 2017 with leg band L94.
    Note: the Brazilian band was replaced as it was corroded and missing some
    bits of metal and in danger of falling apart.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018, and on NB in 2019 and 2020.
    May 30, 2022
    Red L96 left leg -
    9822-52917, Sex unknown
    Banded on North Brother.
    Trapped in 2017 on North Brother - PathTrack tag deployed.
    Seen on Peases Island in 2018,
    and on Cape Sable in 2021.
    Nest R57 on North Brother in 2022.
    June 3, 2022
    Red LD0 right leg -
    9822-53290, Sex unknown
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2019
    June 3, 2022
    Red LJ0 right leg -
    9822-53263, female (genetic analysis)
    Banded as a chick on Gull Island in 2018
    Encountered on North Brother in 2021




    Ted C. D'Eon

    P.O. Box 14
    Middle West Pubnico
    Nova Scotia B0W 2M0
    Canada
    phone (home)1-902-762-2097
             (cellular)1-902-749-6883

    E-Mail to: ted509@gmail.com © Ted C. D'Eon, 2022