TERN REPORT - 2019 - Ted C. D'Eon
LOBSTER BAY - SOUTHWEST NOVA SCOTIA


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  • The Brothers as seen from Lower West Pubnico. (2005 photo)
    The Brothers as seen from Lower West Pubnico. (2005 photo)

    The Brothers are two tiny islands about 1 km west of Lower West Pubnico, Nova Scotia, Canada.
    They are owned by the province and were designated a wildlife management area in April 2007.
    Access to them during nesting season (April 1 to Aug. 31) is by permit only.

    In 2017, the tern colony on The Brothers (actually only on North Brother) was abandoned partway through the nesting season. Strong winds and high tides washed out some of the tern nests early during the incubation phase. The number of nests was low to start with, and with the nest wash out, most of the terns left; gulls and crows finished off the colony.

    By early July 2017, some of our missing birds were found nesting on Gull Island, 8 km to the northwest of North Brothers. Some of the ROST whose nests had been depredated by the crows and gulls on North Brother, actually renested on Gull Island.

    In 2018, we don't believe The Brothers fledged any chicks. On June 16, 2018, there were 74 tern nests (including 2 ROST nests) on North Brother; later in the season the nests were gone as well as the nesting terns.

    Gull Island did a lot better, even though we had not deployed any ROST nesting shelters, on June 16, 2019, we counted 317 tern nests, including 27 ROST nests. Eventually, we had 35 or 37 ROST nests. The last 2 may have been a second attempt at nesting.

    I don't have a firm number on productivity, but I think it was "half decent"; there was a lot of predation by GBBG when the tern chicks were almost fledged.


    This report will cover work being done on both Gull Island and North Brother, mostly from my perspective.

    My work on these islands is done in cooperation with Canadian Wildlife Service (CWS) and the Nova Scotia Department of Lands and Forestry (NSDLF).

    THE BROTHERS, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia
    THE BROTHERS, Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia

    North BROTHERS and GULL ISLAND,<Br>Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia
    North BROTHERS and GULL ISLAND,
    Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia



    OBSERVATIONS:

    The following is a chronological listing of our 2019 work with terns of the Lobster Bay area in general, but in particular, with the Roseate Terns (ROST) of Gull Island and The Brothers. The report also includes tern observations from other professionals and university students working on these islands, as well as observations from local residents.

    March 29, 2019 - We had the good fortune of getting the Nova Scotia Department of Lands and Forestry (NSDLF) helicopter for most of the day to remove old, washed up lobster traps and other debris/garbage from Gull Island. The helicopter also transported my disassembled plywood blind to the island in one of the transits.

    It removed from the island 53 lobster traps, a few buoys and balloons, rope, plastic bottles, and other general garbage. Some pile of stuff! A great job by the NSDLF crew and their superb pilot!

    My job was to unload the cargo nets and trailer their contents away for later disposal in the municipal dump.

    My assistants (No, we didn't get to go in the helicopter) were Nigel D'Eon, Missie D'Eon, and Alix d'Entremont. Thank you all!

    See photos below:

    NS Dept of Lands and Forestry helicopter - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    NS Dept of Lands and Forestry helicopter - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup with Nigel, Missie, and Alix - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup with Nigel, Missie, and Alix - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - Abbott's Harbour, NS, March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull Island Cleanup - March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull Island Cleanup - March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Bird bones in one of the Gull Island lobster traps - March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Bird bones in one of the Gull Island lobster traps - March 29, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    April 18, 2019 - A very disappointing morning! All my fault!

    With the crew of Andrew D'Eon and Terry Bourque, I planned my first trip to Gull Island to drop off my 500 lb concrete anchor block near the island, and to take 50 Roseate Tern (ROST) shelters ashore, as well as my disassembled platform for the plywood blind which I constructed years ago and never used.

    Anyway, I got the boat in the water but I couldn't get it started! It would turn over but not start. I had had it to the mechanic the day before for an oil change, etc., and the motor was working perfectly.

    I tried 2 more batteries but still no luck with the motor, so I scrapped the day to the island and trailered the boat and motor back to the mechanic's.

    He quickly diagnosed the problem. I have a memory problem (I have had it for years)!

    With the ignition key, there is a plastic clip which is supposed to be attached to the "kill" switch; it wasn't attached thereby preventing the motor from starting!

    I just hadn't clued in.

    Ted

    April 19, 2019 - A single tern was seen at Abbott's Harbour by Daryl Amirault and Herbert Nickerson.

    April 24, 2019 - Aldric D'Eon reported seeing a tern 46 nautical miles west of Pubnico Point.

    April 24, 2019 - We try again. This time with crew, Professor Shawn Craik (Université Sainte Anne), Shawn's student, Kristen Noel, and Missie D'Eon.

    The boat was loaded down.

    Loaded down boat - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Loaded down boat - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Kristen and Shawn dropping anchor - April 24, 2019 - Missie D'Eon photo
    Kristen and Shawn dropping anchor - April 24, 2019 - Missie D'Eon photo

    The stuff we brought ashore on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The stuff we brought ashore on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Kristen and Shawn setting up Common Eider nesting shelters on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Kristen and Shawn setting up Common Eider nesting shelters on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A Canada Goose nest on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A Canada Goose nest on Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Shawn documenting the Canada Goose nest; Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Shawn documenting the Canada Goose nest; Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Disassembled blind brought earlier to the island by helicopter; Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Disassembled blind brought earlier to the island by helicopter; Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A young Grey Seal; Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A young Grey Seal (I think we caught it sleeping on the beach); Gull Island - April 24, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    April 25, 2019 - Another helicopter day!

    Pam Mills of the NS Dept. of Lands and Forestry (NSDLF) arranged for their helicopter to be used to transport a wide array materials and equipment to Gull Island. This included 2 plywood blinds, including the mounting bases, 2 sound systems run by solar panels and 4 very heavy batteries, and a pretty sophisticated weather station. The helicopter also transported the crew (us) to the island to begin the assembly of everything. We had the use of the helicopter for 5 or 6 hours and we accomplished a lot, Even the pilot was working with us, wherever he could lend a hand.

    Pam's 2 blinds and the platform for my blind were set up and so was the weather station. Our time ran out before the sound systems were operational. The sound systems would be used to squawk out tern colony sounds in order to entice passing terns to settle down and nest.

    The crew consisted of Pam Mills, Julie McKnight, Shawn Craik, Nick Knutson, Kristen Noel, Justin Amero (NSDLF),Jason Airst (NSDLF), Adil Smith (pilot), and me.

    See photos below:

    Some of the crew: Pam, Julie, Justin, Shawn, Nick, and Kristen - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Some of the crew: Pam, Julie, Justin, Shawn, Nick, and Kristen - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Adil, Pam, and Jason - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Adil, Pam, and Jason - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Justin and Pam - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Justin and Pam - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Shawn and Nick heading out to Gull Island - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Shawn and Nick heading out to Gull Island - Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Julie, working on the sound systems - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Julie, working on the sound systems - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The 2 blinds and the platform - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The 2 blinds and the platform - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The helicopter - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The helicopter - Gull Island - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A selfie of me and Pam, on our way back to Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A selfie of me and Pam, on our way back to Abbott's Harbour - April 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    April 26, 2019 - Lobster fisherman, Edouard D'Eon, reported seeing terns near The Brothers.

    April 30, 2019 - Gull Island

    The crew this time: Julie McKnight, Nick Knutson, Natalie Thimot. and Matthew Deagle.

    We had a long day! We left Abbott's Harbour around 8:45am and got back to the wharf around 5:15pm (with no time for breaks)!

    With all the wind we had had, I was concerned to see if the plywood blinds and platform, and the weather station were still in place; they were all fine; just as we had left them.

    Julie got the sound systems working properly while Matthew and I assembled my plywood blind on the top of the the platform.

    Nick, Natalie, and Matthew worked at setting up the Roseate Tern (ROST) nesting shelters.

    Once the above had been taken care of, a sweep of the island was undertook to document and destroy Great Black-backed Gull (GBBG) nests. Nests containing 2 or 3 eggs were destroyed (under permit); those containing only one egg were left alone for the moment. 39 GBBG nests were destroyed.

    One (I think just one) Common Eider (COEI) nest containing 3 eggs was found; it was not in any of the man-made shelters.

    The Canada Goose nest had been depredated, presumably by GBBG.

    Some photos below:

    Natalie and Nick setting up ROST nesting shelters on Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie and Nick setting up ROST nesting shelters on Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Julie working on one of the sound systems - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Julie working on one of the sound systems - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The weather system - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The weather system (looking south) - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The southwest corner of Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The southwest corner of Gull Island (looking to the east) - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The three plywood observation blinds - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The three plywood observation blinds - Gull Island - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The crew: Nick, Matthew, Natalie, and Julie - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The crew: Nick, Matthew, Natalie, and Julie - April 30, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    May 1, 2019 Ben Morton's cousin, a lobster fisherman, reported seeing a tern near Whitehead (a few km to the east of Gull Island).

    May 6, 2019 - A bummer of a trip to Gull Island.

    We had an easterly wind, but I thought we would be able to land on the island.

    I motored there okay, but with the wind and swell, it would have been dangerous to try a landing on Gull Island.

    We could hear the sound system so we assumed it to be working fine.

    Crew: Julie McKnight. Nick Knutson, Natalie Thimot, and Matthew Deagle.

    May 7, 2019 - Gull Island. A much better day than yesterday.

    9 terns seen but they seemed to be just passing through: 6 of unidentified species, 2 Common Terns (COTE), and 1 Arctic Tern (ARTE).

    Gull Island looking to the south - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Gull Island (looking to the south) - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Early this morning, I was scoping Gull Island from my house (it's 8 km away) and thought I could see terns dive bombing something on there. I said to my wife that the terns looked rather large and looked more like gulls. I figured atmospheric conditions were the cause.

    At the tern nesting area on Gull Island, we found the culprit; a Snowy Owl! It was being dive bombed by Great Black-backed Gulls! That must have been what I was seeing from home.

    The Snowy Owl - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Snowy Owl - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Later on that day, the Snowy Owl was chased away from Gull Island towards Wedgeport by a mob of GBBG.

    The crew today: Nick Knutson, Natalie Thimot, and Matthew Deagle.

    Natalie, Matthew, and Nick - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie, Matthew, and Nick - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    More was done work the ROST shelters; mainly adding finer gravel inside as a better substrate to nest on.

    Nick and Matthew - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nick and Matthew - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Matthew, Nick, and Natalie on the south beach - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Matthew, Nick, and Natalie on the "south" beach - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    As a deterrent to gulls roosting on the plywood blinds, Nick attached chicken wire to the top of the middle blind. Minutes later, a GBBG was sitting on the chicken wire, as if laughing at us.

    Nick, attaching the chicken wire - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nick, attaching the chicken wire - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The Gull on the wire - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Gull on the wire - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    I attached monofilament netting to the top of my blind to see if that would work as a deterrent. While we were on the island, we didn't see ant gulls using it as a perch, but after I got home, I think I saw a gull on there.

    The monofilament netting - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The monofilament netting - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The monofilament netting on the roof of the blind - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The monofilament netting on the roof of the blind - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    At least 2 COEI nests have been depredated; neither was in a man-made shelter.

    The crew documenting a COEI nest - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The crew documenting a COEI nest - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A depredated Common Eider nest - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A depredated Common Eider nest - Gull Island - May 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Now, a total of 39 GBBG nests have been destroyed under permit (leaving 21 GBBG nests containing 1 or 2 eggs untouched, with still more to come)!

    May 7, 2019 - A local lobster fisherman (Graham D'Eon) reported 30 "terns" above The Brothers this morning.

    May 8, 2019 - I scoped The Brothers (from the end of Pond Rd,) this morning but saw no tern activity there. I did see 3 COTE in Pubnico Harbour, by just driving by.

    May 13, 2019 - Gull Island with Nick Knutson, Natalie Thimot, and Matthew Deagle.

    I "planted" a Seabird Nesting Island sign at the north end of the island (near to where we land), while Nick, Natalie, and Matthew began the GBBG and COEI nest survey.

    A flock of 18 terns flew over but did not stay. After that we saw a few small groups of 2 or 3.

    The Seabird Nesting Island sign - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The Seabird Nesting Island sign - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Nick measuring GBBG eggs - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nick measuring GBBG eggs - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Nick and Natalie collecting data - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nick and Natalie collecting data - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Photo above: The gizmo Nick has on his head is a GPS antenna for an exact location of the nests. These are all charted for later analysis.

    A COEI egg laid in a GBBG nest - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A COEI egg laid in a GBBG nest - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Photo above: I have seen this before on The Brothers; I have also seen gull eggs laid in COEI nests. Ted

    Two beautiful COEI nests - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Two beautiful COEI nests - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    We found almost as many (or more) depredated COEI nests as those which were still intact!

    Depredated COEI nest - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Depredated COEI nest - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Still no COEI nests in the man-made shelters.

    The netting I placed on the top of my plywood blind as a deterrent to birds roosting there is not working.

    My Plywood blind - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    My Plywood blind - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    GBBG - a little too comfortable on the netting - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    GBBG - a little too comfortable on the netting - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The crew - Matthew, Natalie, and Nick - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The crew - Matthew, Natalie, and Nick - Gull Island - May 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    May 15, 2019 - Scoping Gull Island between bouts of rain and fog, I believe the plywood blind farther to the south may be down. Yesterday afternoon, we had a lot of wind from the northeast. It may have done some damage.

    May 16, 2019 - Scoping Gull Island again from my house this morning at 7:00am. Definitely a bunch of terns flying around the tern nesting area! Nice to see!

    May 19, 2019 - From Shawn Craik dated, May 20. 2019:

    Natalie, Matthew, Nick, and I made a trip to Gull Island yesterday (May 19) with the taxi service of Ben Morton. We spent about four hours on the island undertaking observations and infrastructure maintenance. Here is a summary of highlights/observations:

    - on arrival to the island, we counted at least 200 terns flying around the North and South colony sites (including at least 2 ROST)

    - courtship feeding observed for COTE/ARTE

    - a number of what seemed to be tern nest-bowl scrapes were observed in the North colony site

    - about 80 GBBG and 12 HERG adults observed on the island upon our arrival (similar to counts during the last visit)

    - 12 new gull nests found (now up to a total of 100 gull nests for the year), so perhaps we have passed peak first nest initiation for GBBG

    - contents of all gull nests containing 2 or 3 eggs or that were otherwise near the tern colony site were destroyed (under CWS permit)

    - significant gull predation observed at eider nests, some of which is the result of our presence (gulls take eggs after we flush eiders from their nest)

    - the southern blind had fallen over, and likely due to a strong north wind; we repositioned the blind and added guy-wires

    - the two sound systems and weather station were operating

    Thanks Shawn; great work, all of you!

    May 20, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont reported seeing about 130 terns at North Brother this morning.

    May 25, 2019 - Gull Island with Shawn Craik, Natalie Thimot, and Matthew Deagle.

    The number of terns was lower than on the last visit; I think one ROST was seen or heard. More details to follow when I receive it.

    I was very busy getting bird spikes installed to the roofs of the plywood blinds; I only got one blind done. It took longer than anticipated.

    See Shawn Craik's summary below:

    Ted, Natalie, Matthew and I spent about two hours on Gull Island yesterday (25 May) morning. The weather was perfect for a sail to the island.

    Some highlights:

    - about 50 GBBG and 12 HERG around the island upon arrival (this is a significant decrease in GBBG activity compared to the last visit)

    - a group of about 75 terns, including at least one ROST near the south end of the island upon our arrival

    - 30 minutes of observation and a quick jaunt through the colony indicated that tern egg-laying has not begun, however, much courtship behaviour observed for both ARTE and COTE, and 3-4 nest scrapes observed in grassy habitat in front of southern blind (likely COTE); so nesting is a little slower in getting started than last year when 7 tern nests were counted on 22 May

    - Ted was successful in adding spikes to the roof of 'his' blind (we need to name the 3 blinds!)

    - we walked through the gull/eider colony

    - - 15 new gull nests found

    - - eggs removed from advanced gull clutches

    - - 12 or 13 gull nests active as of our departure

    - - a few new eider nests were found; 26 of 39 nests have been depredated or flooded

    - sound systems and weather station working just fine

    Shawn

    Thanks, Shawn.

    Bird spikes on one of the blinds - Gull Island - May 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Bird spikes on one of the blinds - Gull Island - May 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Natalie, Matthew, and Shawn - Gull Island - May 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie, Matthew, and Shawn - Gull Island - May 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    May 28, 2019 - Gull Island with Julie McKnight and Nick Knutson.

    The following from Julie McKnight:

    28-May-2019:

    We observed 45 DCCO loafing on the N tip as we approached and 7+ Brant on the island plus shorebirds (Ruddy Turnstones, Yellowlegs)

    We counted 44 GBBG from the storage spot and 4 HERG. One HERG looked nesty so keep an eye out for small eggs/ incubating HERG.

    A total of 10 new GBBG nests were found and 5 nests with eggs left from the last visit were relocated. We removed the contents of all 15 nests.

    We counted 16 mixed terns leave the ground on approach to the North Colony.

    The sound systems were working correctly and the weather data looks good. I'll send that along later.

    Ted completed placing spikes on the blinds. I dare a gull to find a square inch without a spike!

    Thanks, Julie.

    Bird spikes on the top of the blinds - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Bird spikes on the top of the blinds - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Depredated COEI nest - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Depredated COEI nest - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Nick and Julie - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nick and Julie - Gull Island - May 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    May 28, 2019 - Today, on The Brothers, Alix d'Entremont had a much better rapport with terns than we had on Gull Island.

    Alix writes:

    9 ROST on North Brother (7 with field readable bands)

    About 60 or so terns on North Brother at 11:30 am today (May 28). Many COTE arriving to the island (from north and south) with food in the bill. Here are the band resights:

    White on red
    B65
    L53
    B70
    L95
    L36
    L57
    
    Black on yellow
    TR3

    One ROST without bands and one with two metal bands. I've attached the photos so that you can check that I've read the band codes correctly. Where does the band with black letters on a yellow background come from?

    Alix Arthur d'Entremont

    Cropped photo of the N Brother ROST with the T83 band - May 28, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont photo
    Cropped photo of the N Brother ROST with the T83 band - May 28, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont photo

    Thanks, Alix.

    Note about the "TR3" band. Dr. Jeffrey Spendelow wrote:

    The yellow w/ black font "alpha-alpha-numeric" series PFRs haven't been distributed for use (and TR3 hasn't even been made) yet, but we will start using them this summer.

    The correct code for this PFR band is T83. This ROST was banded as a chick 6-24-16 at Eastern Egg Rock, Maine, and I saw it last year at South Monomoy Island, MA on 7 Sep.

    Dr. Jeffrey Spendelow, is a Research Wildlife Biologist with the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center (PWRC) in Laurel, Maryland, USA. He has worked with Roseate Terns most of his adult life and is the person to contact for tern leg band questions and comments.

    Thank you, Jeff.

    June 2, 2019 - A note from Alix d'Entremont.

    60 or so terns at North Brother today. Saw one ROST and a few ARTE, but most were certainly COTE.

    Thanks, Alix.

    June 7, 2019 - North Brother and Gull Island with Nick Knutson, Natalie Thimot and Matthew Deagle.

    A vibrant tern colony on North Brother this morning!

    - between 300 and 350 terns on the island, including about 20 ROST.

    - at least 200 tern nests, including 7 confirmed ROST nests; there could very well be as many as 15 or more ROST nests in total.

    Nest count on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nest count on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Nest count on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Nest count on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Roseate Tern nest on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Roseate Tern nest on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Roseate Tern nest R007 on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Roseate Tern nest R007 on North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    - we did not see any gull nests on N Brother; there were a number of COEI nests found (I don't have the count, but perhaps 8 to 10.

    - the colony looked very healthy.

    Between Matthew and me, we managed to photograph 18 field readable leg bands: 1V51 (banded as a chick on NB in 2002), 411V (banded as a chick on Bird Island, Buzzards Bay, MA in 2009), 805N (banded as a chick on NB in 2009), B00 (nesting under a board). B25, B33, B65, B70, B75, B76, B89, C59 (banded on Country Island, Nova Scotia), L08, L12, L13, L16, L40, and L93 (on nest R001).

    See a few photos below:

    ROST B00, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST B00, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST L93, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST L93, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST C59, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST C59, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    17 year old ROST 1V51, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    17 year old ROST 1V51, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST 1V51, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST 1V51, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST 411V, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST 411V, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST L16, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST L16, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST L16, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST L16, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST B75, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST B75, North Brother - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Grim on Gull Island this morning.

    - about 20 terns there upon our arrival.

    - only 2 tern nests that I saw; there may have been a few more.

    - possibly more ARTE than COTE; no ROST observed on Gull Island today.

    - still a lot of gull presence on the island (mostly GBBG).

    - more gull nests destroyed

    - COEI nest number now 48; much predation by GBBG. Depredation of COEI nests by the gulls partly due to our presence on the island.

    A couple of observations from my plywood blind on Gull Island.

    Courtship between what I thought were two ARTE. Now I'm not sure if the one arriving with the fish was a true ARTE or an ARTE/COTE hybrid; the wings look ARTE but the bill look somewhat COTE, with the dark tip of the upper mandible. the accompanying ARTE accepted the fish.

    See photos below:

    Arctic Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic? Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Arctic Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic? Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Arctic Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic? Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Arctic Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic? Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Arctic Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Arctic? Terns on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Also from my blind, I photographed an ARTE with two metal bands. The field readable is somewhat fuzzy, but could be something like CX50 or CXS0. See below.

    Banded Arctic Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Banded Arctic Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Banded Arctic Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Banded Arctic Tern on Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A note from Jeffrey Spendelow, June 14, 2019:

    I just saw the picture of the ARTE with a MFR band on Ted's blog. The MFRs used on ARTEs have two letters on the top row and two numbers on the bottom row, so I think CX50 is correct.

    Thanks, Jeff.

    A note from Paula Shannon to Jeffrey, Julie, and me, June 14, 2019:

    CX50 was used on an ARTE chick on Machias Seal Island, NB in 2003. I took a look at the picture too, and wondered if it could be CX30, which was trapped and banded as an adult the same year (which was two years before the colony collapsed). Either way, neither bird has been seen again since its banding.

    Paula Shannon (I think) works for the National Audubon Society's Seabird Restoration Program.

    Thank you, Paula.

    The crew: Nick, Matthew, and Natalie - Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The crew: Nick, Matthew, and Natalie - Gull Island - June 7, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    June 8, 2019 - Seaweed harvester, David Surette, reported motoring by Île Ferrée in Pubnico Harbour. He did not land on the island, but said there were a lot of terns there and that they must be nesting.

    Île Ferrée, Pubnico Harbour - Ted D'Eon photo
    Île Ferrée, Pubnico Harbour - Ted D'Eon photo

    June 10, 2019 - North Brother - Shawn Craik writes:

    Natalie, Matthew and I steamed to North Brother Island yesterday to check on the tern/eider colony. The weather was splendid!

    Here are some highlights of our observations :

    - The goals of the trip were to photograph banded ROST, to confirm/mark all ROST and ARTE nests, and to mark a sample of COTE nests for reproductive monitoring.

    - At least 250 terns flushed upon our arrival to the island.

    - Overall, the colony seems healthy – birds vigourously defended nesting territories as we walked through the colony.

    - Natalie and Matthew brought the number of confirmed ROST nests to 31 (R1 to R31 on sticks). They both feel that a large number of these nests were likely initiated after the last visit on Friday. There may be at least 5 or 10 more ROST nests on the island. At least two subcolonies are forming.

    - We confirmed and marked 31 ARTE nests (A1 to A31). All but one nest were located on the N-NE ridge. There are likely a few more ARTE nests to confirm along that ridge, but we suspect that we marked the majority of nests, all of which had either two or three eggs.

    - 22 COTE nests were randomly chosen throughout the colony and marked (C1 to C22). Ideally, we would mark another 8 to 10 nests on Thursday to bring the number to at least 30 (to gain statistical power).

    - The bright, overhead sun made it difficult for Matthew to take great photos at first, but he adjusted the camera's exposure and was able to add some observations to the band resighting database.

    - We estimate that at least 15-17 active COEI nests are on the island. At least one nest had its eggs spilled out.

    - No gull nests encountered.

    - Very few empty tern nest bowls - this is a sign that there has been little egg predation.

    Matthew, Natalie, and Shawn

    Thanks, Shawn.

    June 13, 2019 - Gull Island and North Brother - Natalie Thimot writes:

    Ted, Julie, Matthew and I went to Gull Island and North Brother Island today. Here's what we were up to:

    Gull Island:

    - We saw 5 terns flying over Gull and found no new tern nests.

    - There were no eggs in the two nests (1 COTE and 1 ARTE) that we had previously found on the western side of the island.

    - There were still ~45 gulls on the island, and we destroyed 8 nests.

    - At least two eider nests hatched, hooray! I found one nest with 1 membrane, and one nest with 4 membranes. We're up to 52 eider nests now.

    Natalie holding up egg membrane from COEI nest - Gull Island - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie holding up egg membrane from COEI nest - Gull Island - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    North Brother Island:

    - Matthew and I looked for new ROST and ARTE nests and we confirmed most of our previous 31 ROST nests.

    - Ted and Julie took photos of more ROST bands. Looking forward to see if we get any new ones!

    - We found another 12 ROST nests, which brings our total up to 43!!

    - Matthew found a few new ARTE nests, so I believe we're following 35.

    - We're also following 30 randomly selected COTE nests.

    - Julie and Ted brought the weather station over from Gull and installed it on North Brother.

    Julie, setting up the weather station on North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Julie, setting up the weather station on North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    - We saw one GBBG being chased away by a couple terns next to the island, but so far there's no evidence of predation on the island.

    Natalie

    Thank you, Natalie.

    Natalie Thimot - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie Thimot - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Julie McKnight and I photographed 19 ROST field readable leg bands - B00, B12, B65, B89, C16, L00, L08, L12, L16, L35, L47 (nesting in R24), L57, L76, L81, L87, L93, L99, T83 (nest R27 ?), and Y12.

    B12, L00, L76, L81, L87, and L99 were new new bands for this season.

    A few photos:

    ROST T83 - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST T83 - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST L93 - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST L93 - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    ROST B65 (looks almost like a penguin) - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    ROST B65 (looks almost like a penguin!) - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The crew: Julie, Matthew, and Natalie - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The crew: Julie, Matthew, and Natalie - North Brother - June 13, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    June 18, 2019 - North Brother.

    Crew today: Julie McKnight, Pamela Mills, Natalie Thimot, and Matthew Deagle.

    Pamela, Matthew, Natalie, and Julie - Abbott's Harbour - June 18, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Pamela, Matthew, Natalie, and Julie - Abbott's Harbour - June 18, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Conducting the census - North Brother - June 18, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Conducting the census - North Brother - June 18, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Julie McKnight recaps our visit to the island where we conducted the official nest count.

    Tern Census final result: 454 nests including 47 ROST

    Terns

    454 nests total:

    1 egg: 48

    2 eggs: 255

    3 eggs: 150

    4 eggs: 1

    Clutch size = 2.23 eggs/nests

    10 eggs were found “out of the nest”

    1 was predated (avian). There was a Herring Gull hanging out on the rocks at the Southern tip and there are Herring Gulls and a Great Black-backed Gull on South Brother. Those Herring Gulls may be nesting. Worth a check?

    24 chicks hatched (5.3% hatch)

    47 ROST nests marked to date. The tern density at the site is incredible. At one point when I was watching a new ROST nest discovered yesterday, I saw two incubating ROSTs turn their heads and their bills almost touched.

    Eiders:

    10 nests discovered, only 2 active:

    3 – warm

    7 - warm

    3 eggs – cold

    7 eggs – cold

    3 – cold

    3 – cold

    4 – cold

    2 - cold

    5 - wet/ out of the nest/cold

    4 - cold

    Thank you, Julie.

    Julie and I took some time to photograph leg bands. We got B25, B33, B65, L00, L05, L35, L45, L47, L76, L93, T83, Y12, and 1V51.

    L05 and L45 are new for this season.

    June 19, 2019 - North Brother.

    Shawn Craik wrote:

    Matthew, Natalie, and I spent a little over an hour on NBI yesterday. The goal was to visit marked nests for the three tern species and to obtain GPS coordinates at nests.

    Hatching is well underway for the three species (4 ROST nests and about 25-30% of followed ARTE and COTE nests with chicks). There is little evidence of egg predation, and the few nest bowls without eggs are most likely nests with hatched young.

    A new ROST nest was discovered, and there may be at least one other nest. So there is a good chance that at least 50 pairs of ROST are on NBI this year!

    Thank you, Shawn.

    June 23, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont landed on Île Ferrée, Pubnico Harbour, and counted 170 tern nests!; some eggs had hatched. The island is essentially a round rock with a flat top, about 30 metres in diameter.

    All the terns were COTE.

    June 25, 2019 - North Brother and Gull Island.

    Crew: Julie McKnight, Natalie Thimot, Nick Knutson, Matthew Deagle, Aldric d'Entremont, and me.

    North Brother:

    Julie, Natalie, Matthew, and Nick surveyed the marked tern nests for egg and chick occupancy and banded tern chicks which were old enough to carry a leg band. They also documented the type of fish the terns were bringing in, and the direction they were coming from (I don't have all the details).

    Doing a tern nest survey - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Doing a tern nest survey - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    One gull nest was found at the south end of the island and was destroyed. The eggs were cold.

    Aldric and I reinstalled the weather station. It had been removed the previous week due to a communication malfunction with Julie's laptop. It proved to only be a minor glitch; nothing serious.

    After the weather station, I spent some time in a portable blind to see if I could get a few more leg bands. I managed to get B12, B65, B70, L00, L12, L16, L32, L40, L76, L93, L94, L99, T83, Y15 and 1V51. Matthew also got some of these plus B25 and L45.

    Red L94 and yellow Y15 were new for this season.

    Julie McKnight writes:

    L94 is the bird originally banded in Brazil - I switched out its band and added L94 in 2017 when we put a tracker on it (which we didn’t get back). Good to see it.

    Thanks, Julie.

    As for Y15, Paula Shannon writes that this "bird was banded on Eastern Egg Rock as a chick in 2017".

    Matthew also identified the parents of two nests: nest R29 had two unbanded terns incubating its eggs, and nest R30 had L00 and L99.

    Matthew and I also photographed a few terns of all 3 species carrying fish; they all seemed to be carrying White Hake.

    Roseate Tern carrying White Hake (I think) - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Roseate Tern carrying White Hake (I think) - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A beautifully streamlined Roseate Tern - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A beautifully streamlined Roseate Tern - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The same Roseate Tern as above - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The same Roseate Tern as above - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A Roseate Tern vocalizing at a Common Tern intruder - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A Roseate Tern vocalizing at a Common Tern intruder - North Brother - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Gull Island:

    Definitely a decrease in gull presence on the island, but still 25 or so, mostly GBBG.

    8 terns were seen and one tern nest (probably ARTE) was found. Both sound systems were working perfectly.

    One gull nest was found and destroyed.

    Several new COEI nests with warm eggs were also found. Perhaps these will have a chance to produce ducklings now that the gull population is down.

    From the south end of the island, looking to the northwest - Gull Island - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    From the south end of the island, looking to the northwest - Gull Island - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Matthew, Julie, Nick, Aldric, and Natalie - Gull Island - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Matthew, Julie, Nick, Aldric, and Natalie - Gull Island - June 25, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    June 26, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont writes:

    Bertin d'Eon and I did the Coffin Island, Queens County, nest count yesterday (June 25).

    There were no terns on Toby Island, but those birds seemed to have moved to Coffin.

    We counted 455 nests on Coffin and had one ROST (no breeding evidence).

    I estimated the ratio of Common vs. Arctic at 2:1.

    Thanks, Alix.

    June 28, 2019 - Whitehead Island.

    This morning, I took Shawn Craik and Natalie Thimot to Whitehead Island (about 4 km west of Abbott's Harbour).

    They were there to download to computer, data collected by an antenna equipped GPS base station established on the island a month earlier. The month earlier, 7 or 8 nesting Herring Gulls were equipped with GPS units which would track their travels over the next several months.

    Whenever, these gulls returned within a km or two from the base unit, their wanderings would automatically be recorded by the base unit.

    Once this data is collected and processed, a map of the gulls' travels can be produced.

    Natalie and Shawn - Whitehead Island - June 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie and Shawn - Whitehead Island - June 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Natalie and Shawn - Whitehead Island - June 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie and Shawn - Whitehead Island - June 28, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    June 28, 2019 - Shawn Craik and Natalie Thimot then went to North Brother.

    Shawn writes:

    Natalie and I sailed to NBI yesterday to monitor nests, conduct feeding watches (lots of hake and herring), and band ROST young (6).

    Two new ROST nests were marked.

    Thanks, Shawn.

    Natalie Thimot writes (June 29, 2019):

    (We're) Up to 52 ROST nests! We ended up marking 3 new nests yesterday.

    Thank you, Natalie.

    This is great news! I thought getting 50 ROST nests this year on North Brother would be a stretch. This is fantastic!

    July 3, 2019 - Alix d'Entremont writes:

    I've been seeing a number of ROST feeding along the coast of Pubnico Harbour from Muff Rd to Dennis Point Wharf at high tide for more than a week now.

    There were at least 5 there a few days ago. I've seen one ROST at Abbotts Harbour feeding north of the wharf.

    I went to Bon Portage Island last evening (tide less than half, going up) and had one ROST on a buoy here (https://goo.gl/maps/jbpJGnZtJbZiLKbo6). There were only two Common Terns around John's Island, that one ROST on a buoy and two more Commons near Soloman's Island.

    There is a new small tern colony of about 30 or so nests at Bon Portage Island. I don't have my field book here, so don't have the nest number right now. Most are COTE, but there were a few ARTE nests as well.

    Alix Arthur d'Entremont

    Thanks, Alix. Great work!

    July 8, 2019 - North Brother with Natalie Thimot and Matthew Deagle to do feeding watches and to check the status of a number of assigned tern nests for their projects.

    Some of the boats at Abbott's Harbour - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Some of the boats at Abbott's Harbour - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    My 23 foot boat is dwarfed by the others at the wharf!

    Matthew and Natalie in their blinds - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Matthew and Natalie in their blinds - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Many of the tern eggs have hatched but some are still being incubated.

    I would say the principal fish being brought in by the terns is the Sandlance. Often, it seems to be the ROST as the principal tern bringing in Sandlance, but this year, COTE were everywhere with Sandlance in their bills!

    Common Tern with Sandlance - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Common Tern with Sandlance - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    COTE were also bringing in White Hake in moderate amounts. I did not actually see any terns bringing in Herring although I am sure some quick transfers of unidentified fish may have been Herring.

    Common Tern with White Hake - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Common Tern with White Hake - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Some other identified fish species brought in by COTE were Skulpin, Butterfish, and, I think, Mummichog.

    Common Tern with Skulpin - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Common Tern with Skulpin - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    The same Tern with Skulpin as above - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The same Tern with Skulpin as above - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    It's chick swallowed the Skulpin.

    A poor photo of a COTE with Butterfish - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A poor photo of a COTE with Butterfish - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A poor photo of a COTE chick swallowing a Sandlance, tail first - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A poor photo of a COTE chick swallowing a Sandlance, tail first
    - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    A Common Tern on nest - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    A Common Tern on nest - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Common Tern adult and chick - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Common Tern adult and chick - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Common Tern - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Common Tern - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Since I had my portable blind in an area with very few ROST, I was only able to get 3 leg bands - C59, L57, and L93. All were previously seen birds,

    Roseate Tern C59 with Sandlance - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Roseate Tern C59 with Sandlance - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo

    Natalie and Matthew - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    Natalie and Matthew - North Brother - July 8, 2019 - Ted D'Eon photo
    The sticks on their heads are to discourage the attacking terns from striking their heads.

    July 10, 2019 - Ronnie d'Entremont writes:

    The best place in Canada to see Roseate Terns is in West Pubnico, as we have about 100 adults on nearby North Brother Island.

    This evening I was treated to one feeding at point blank range just to the south of Dennis Point. This is the closest I have ever been to one feeding. July 10th (2019).

    Roseate Tern - Dennis Point Wharf, Lower West Pubnico, NS - July 10, 2019 - Ronnie d'Entremont photo

    Ronnie also photographed ROST L76 at Dennis Point wharf.

    Great photo and photo opportunity!

    Thanks, Ronnie.

    July 14, 2019 - At 6pm, Ronnie d'Entremont writes:

    At least 6 Roseates feeding at wharf #4. Dennis Point!

    Thanks, Ronnie! Seems like Dennis Point wharves in Lower West Pubnico, are still the best place in Canada to see a Roseate Tern from the mainland! Thanks for the info.





    Field-readable Roseate Tern leg bands - The Brothers & Gull Island - 2019. (See below)

    Resighted and new leg bands on Roseate Terns from The Brothers & Gull Island in 2019
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B00 right leg - Nesting in nest R007-2019
    1172-79309
    Banded as an adult on North Brother on June 21, 2012.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B11 right leg -
    1172-79312
    Banded as an adult on North Brother on June 21, 2012
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2013, 2914, 2015 and 2016, on Gull Island in 2017, and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    June 13, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B12 right leg -
    1172-79313
    Banded on North Brother as an adult in 2012.
    Also seen on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B19 ? leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on North Brother.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B25 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on North Brother.
    Previously seen on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B33 right leg -
    1172-79337
    Banded on North Brother.
    Also seen on North Brother in 201
    and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B39 right leg -
    1172-79344
    Banded as an adult on North Brother in 2013.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2014, 2015,
    in 2017 on North Brother and on Gull Island,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    May 28, 2019
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B65 left leg -
    0802-04928
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2007
    Previously seen on North Brother in 2014, 2015, and 2016,
    and on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    May 28, 2019
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B70 left leg -
    9822-51505
    Banded as an adult on North Brother in 2014.
    Seen on North Brother in 2015 and on Gull Island in 2018.

    Note:Rip in centre of right foot webbing - see photo from 2014
    June 7, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B75 left leg -
    9822-51511
    Banded as an adult in 2014 on North Brother.
    Encountered on North Brother in 2015 and 2016,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    Nested with B90 on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B76 left leg -
    9822-51512
    Banded as an adult in 2014 on North Brother.
    Encountered 2016 North Brother. Encountered in 2017 and 2018 on Gull Island.
    Nested with an unbanded bird in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B89 left leg -
    9822-51524
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2014.
    Previously seen on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B90 right leg -
    9822-51525
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2014.
    Nested with B75 on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red B95 right leg -
    9822-51530
    Banded on North Brother.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red C16 left leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on Country Island, Nova Scotia.
    Also seen on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    July 8, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red C59 left leg -
    1172-79564
    Banded on Country Island, Nova Scotia.
    Previously seen on Gull Island in 2017.
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L00 left leg -
    9822-51537
    Banded as an adult on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, June 25, 2015.
    Also seen on North Brother in 2016, and on Gull Island in 2018.
    Paired with L99 on North Brother in 2019.
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L03 left leg -
    9822-51537
    Banded as an adult on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, June 25, 2015.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2016 and 2017,
    on Gull Island in 2017, and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    June 18, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L05 left leg -
    0802-04917
    Banded as a chick on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia, on July 16, 2007.
    L05 band placed on it on June 25, 2015, at North Brother.
    Paired with L02 in 2015.
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2016 and 2017,
    on Gull Island in 2017, and on the Bear Point Thrums in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L08 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded as a ? on North Brother,
    Nova Scotia.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L12 right leg -
    9822-51546
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    Nested on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L13 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on North Brother.
    Seen on Peases Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L16 right leg -
    9822-51550
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    Nested on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L32 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on North Brother.
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L35 left leg -
    1172-79448
    Originally banded C53 as a chick on Country Island in 2012.
    Must have lost its C53 band.
    Rebanded on North Brother with PFR L35 in 2017.
    Observed on the Bear Point Thrums in 1018.
    May 28, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L36 left leg -
    9822-51567
    Banded on North Brother as an adult in 2018. Seen on
    Gull Island in 2017 and on Peases Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L40 left leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded on North Brother.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2017.
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L45 left leg -
    9822-51571
    Banded as a chick on North Brother, Nova Scotia, in 2016.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L47 right leg - Nesting in nest R24-2019
    9822-51573
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    May 28, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L53 left leg -
    9822-51577
    Banded on North Brother as a chick in 2016.
    May 28, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    July 8, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L57 right leg -
    9822-51582
    Banded on North Brother as a chick in 2016.
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    July 10, 2019
    at Dennis Point
    Red L76 right leg -
    9822-51600
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L81 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    June 13, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L87 right leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded in ????, on North Brother, Nova Scotia.
    June 7, 2019
    and June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    July 8, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L93 left leg - Nesting in nest R001-2019
    9822-52914
    Banded in 2017 as an adult on North Brother and received a PathTrack GPS tag.
    Nesting in nest R001 on N Brother in 2019.
    Encountered on Gull Island in 2017 and 2018.
    Nesting on Gull Island in 2018 with an unbanded bird.
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L94 left leg -
    9999-00010
    Originally banded in 2005 in Mangue Seco, Brazil, with band H70051
    Rebanded on North Brother as an adult in 2017 with leg band L94.
    Note: the Brazilian band was replaced as it was corroded and missing some
    bits of metal and in danger of falling apart.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018.
    May 28, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L95 left leg -
    9822-52916
    Banded on North Brother as an adult in 2017.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018
    June 10, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red L99 left leg -
    9822-52919
    Banded on North Brother.
    Observed on Gull Island in 2018.
    Paired with L00 on North Brother in 2019.
    May 28, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Yellow T83 left leg -
    9999-00011
    Banded as a chick on Eastern Egg Rock, Maine, on June 24, 2016.
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    Yellow Y15 left leg -
    xxxx-xxxxx
    Banded as a chick on Eastern Egg Rock, Maine, in 2017.
    June 10, 2019
    June 13, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    on North Brother
    Red Y12 left leg -
    No USGS band
    Probable male - seen carrying fish in courtship display
    on North Brother on May 30, 2017.
    Banded as a chick at Country Island in 2014 (USGS 9822-52710)
    and seen as an adult there on July 17, 2016
    June 7, 2019
    June 18, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    1V51 left leg -
    0802-69901
    Also seen on N. Brother in 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013, 2014, and 2016
    Banded as a chick on North Brother July 3, 2002
    This bird is 17 years old!
    June 7, 2019
    June 10, 2019
    on North Brother
    411V left leg -
    1322-10141,
    Banded as a chick on Bird Island,
    Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, in 2009.
    Previously seen on North Brother in 2017 and 2018.
    June 13, 2019
    June 25, 2019
    on North Brother
    680E left leg -
    0802-69028
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2005.
    Also seen on North Brother in 2012, 2013 and 2017,
    and on Gull Island in 2018.
    June 7, 2019
    on North Brother
    805N right leg -
    0802-04960
    Banded as a chick on North Brother in 2009
    Also seen on North Brother in 2014, 2015, 2016, and 2018.

    Ted C. D'Eon

    P.O. Box 14
    Middle West Pubnico
    Nova Scotia B0W 2M0
    Canada
    phone (home)1-902-762-2097
             (cellular)1-902-749-6883

    E-Mail to: ted509@gmail.com © Ted C. D'Eon, 2019